Training

Current listing:

Teaching Academy Information Sessions

Do you have a colleague who may be interesting in learning about the Teaching Academy?  Please send them this invitation to join us and learn a bit more about what the Teaching Academy has to offer.

Informative sessions for graduate students or post-doctoral fellows interested in learning about the Teaching Academy programs and offerings will be held:

EAST BALTIMORE CAMPUS

Friday, September 6th from 3:00-4:00 PM in the Preclinical Teaching Building, Room 113.  Snack and drinks provided. Registration in advance is appreciated, but not required. Please register here.

HOMEWOOD CAMPUS

Thursday, September 5th from 5:30-6:30 PM in the MSE Library, Q-Level, Garrett Room. Snack and drinks provided. Registration in advance is appreciated, but not required. Please register here.

Pizza & Pedagogy

Join your Teaching Academy Fellows for light fare and the opportunity to discuss teaching topics with guest faculty! Intended for those with little or no formal pedagogical training, these workshops are designed to prepare instructors to teach effectively at the university level. Open to all graduate students and post-doctoral fellows regardless of division.  Note: For certificate track participants, attending a total of any six workshops in combination [Pizza and Pedagogy, Eyes-on-Teaching, KSAS Graduate Teaching Seminar (KSAS only), Faculty Exchanges (2 max) or CIRTL Workshops] may count as your Phase I -CIRTL Associate level.

Pizza & Pedagogy Series 2019-2020
When: First and Second Thursday, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Location: alternates between Homewood and E. Baltimore campuses


HOMEWOOD CAMPUS
Registration: Seating is limited; please register by clicking here.

October 3rd: Teaching at Different Types of Universities - Panel Discussion
Beth Ann Baunoch, Assistant Professor, Community College of Baltimore Country
Rebecca Kelly, Associate Teaching Professor, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences
J. Kemi Ladeji-Osias, Associate Professor, Morgan State University, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Alison Papadakis, Associate Teaching Professor; Director of Clinical Psychological Studies, Johns Hopkins University, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

November 7th: Design Strategies for Lecture Presentations (Slides and Posters)
Presented by Reid Sczerba, Multimedia Development Specialist, The Center for Educational Resources, Johns Hopkins University

December 5th: Effective Teaching Using the Case Method
Presented by Illysa Izenberg, Senior Lecturer, Center for Leadership Education, Johns Hopkins University

February 6th: Topic will be confirmed shortly.
Presenter to be confirmed shortly.

March 5th: Writing an Effective Teaching Statement
Presented by Richard Brown, Director of Undergraduate Studies; Associate Teaching Professor, Department of Mathematics, Johns Hopkins University

April 2nd: Learning Theory and Pedagogy in Practice
Presented by
Carey Borkoski, Assistant Professor, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University
Camille Bryant, Associate Professor, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University, and
Brianne Roos, Affliate Faculty, Loyola University and Graduate Student, School of Education, Johns Hopkins University


E. BALTIMORE CAMPUS
Registration: Seating is limited; please register by clicking here.

September 12th: Academic Job Search: Teaching Intensive Faculty Positions (This is a Teaching Academy special event which will run from 8:30 AM - 1 PM. Register here.
Presented by Brian Rybarczyk, Teaching Professor, Assistant Dean for Academic and Professional Development of The Graduate School; Associate Director SPIRE Postdoctoral Fellowship – University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

October 10th: Active Learning Technologies - Tools and Activities to Help you Engage Your Students
Presented by Meiling May, PhD Candidate, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Department of Molecular Biology & Genetics and Kelly Clark, Teaching Academy Program Manager

November 14th: Time Management for Future Faculty
Presented by Patti Anderson, Director of Wellness and Health Promotion, Johns Hopkins University Health Services

December 12th: Universal Design for Learning
Presented by Elizabeth Golub, Director, Online Programs for Applied Learning; Senior Lecturer, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University

February 13th: How to Write a Good Test
Presented by Sarah Leupen, Senior Lecturer, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Maryland, Baltimore County

March 12th: Topic will be confirmed shortly.
Presenter to be confirmed shortly.

April 9th: Online Teaching
Presented by Elizabeth Golub, Director, Online Programs for Applied Learning; Senior Lecturer, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University

Eyes on Teaching

Intended for those with little or no formal pedagogical training, these workshops are designed to prepare instructors to teach effectively at the university level.

Workshops are open to all graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, lecturers, and faculty with instructional appointments in Arts & Sciences or Engineering.  Also open to any graduate student or post-doctoral fellow enrolled in the certificate track program regardless of division.  Note: For certificate track participants, attending a total of any six workshops in combination [Pizza and Pedagogy, Eyes-on-Teaching, KSAS Graduate Teaching Seminar (KSAS only), Faculty Exchanges (2 max) or CIRTL Workshops] may count as your Phase I -CIRTL Associate level.

Eyes on Teaching Series - Fall 2019
When: Wednesdays, 5:00 PM - 6:00 PM
Location: Brody Learning Commons, Room 5017
All sessions presented by Dr. Richard Shingles, Lecturer, Biology, Johns Hopkins University

Registration: Seating is limited; please register by clicking here.

September 11th: Preparing a Course Syllabus

September 18th: Preparing for the First Day of Class

September 25th: Lecture Strategies

October 2nd: Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning

October 9th: Active Learning in Practice

October 16rd: Testing and Grading

October 23rd: Instructional Media and Technology

October 30th: Evaluation to Improve Instruction

KSAS Graduate Teaching Seminar

The Graduate Teaching Seminar is a forum for graduate students interested in discussing teaching strategies and collaborating to generate solutions to challenges in the classroom. We welcome graduate student teachers and post-doctoral fellows from all KSAS departments to attend any sessions that may be helpful for their teaching practice and professional development.

Note: For certificate track participants, attending a total of any six workshops in combination [Pizza and Pedagogy, Eyes-on-Teaching, KSAS Graduate Teaching Seminar (KSAS only), Faculty Exchanges (2 max) or CIRTL Workshops] may count as your Phase I -CIRTL Associate level.

KSAS Graduate Teaching Seminar Series (Fall 2019)
When: Thursdays, 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Location: Gilman Hall, Room 400

Registration: Seating is limited; please register by clicking here.
 


August 29th: Preparing for the First Day
Come discuss any last-minute ideas, questions, or anxieties you have about the start of your sections or classes and work through challenges you anticipate on the first day with current and former teacher peers.

September 12th: Better Questions: Planning a Successful Discussion
This workshop will help participants find ways to write and frame questions that foster more engaging and more productive class discussions. We will focus in particular on how to create questions based on texts, and how to ensure that those questions are appropriately clear and rigorous.

Note: Please bring a copy of a short text that you have assigned or might assign to your students.

September 19th: Avoiding Papers: New Ways to Assess Your Students
Come to this session to learn about new kinds of assessments that you can give your students instead of papers. We’ll look at examples of creative and non-traditional projects that have been used recently in humanities and social science classes, and we’ll talk about what kinds of learning they do or don’t assess well. We especially encourage teachers who are preparing DTF applications or other course proposals or syllabi to attend.

September 26th: Writing Rubrics: Making and Using Them
This workshop will give you the chance to explore the benefits and drawbacks of using rubrics to grade student writing; examine different models of effective rubrics; and produce a rubric appropriate to your discipline that you can use right away with your students.

October 10th: Your First Lecture
For those students who anticipate giving a guest lecture in a course this semester or later on, this workshop will highlight techniques for hooking your audience, incorporating their participation into your presentation, and breaking up your speaking to maintain their attention and interest. We’ll also offer tips on how to start planning and writing.

October 17th: Acting on Feedback
The goal of this session will be to identify concrete ways we can improve our teaching, in the middle of the semester or for future courses. We’ll talk about areas for growth that we’ve identified for ourselves and share feedback we’ve received from students. We’ll also discuss ways to respond to that feedback—both how to implement it and how to communicate the implementation back to students.

Note: Please bring examples of responses to informal or formal teaching evaluations that your students have completed, from a current or former course. If you haven’t gotten any feedback but want to, feel free to borrow or adapt any of the examples found here.

November 14th: Making an Exam
Aimed particularly at those of you teaching or planning to teach your own courses, we’ll use this session to try to answer the question: what does a well-crafted exam look like? We’ll evaluate different types of questions and their phrasing in order to create our own exams whose format and language are clear, aligned to course content and skills, and rigorous.

November 21st: Review Activities
As the end of the semester approaches, come discuss ways to help your students review material in preparation for a final exam. We’ll share strategies for incorporating review activities into section/class time, creating written review materials, leading group review sessions, and communicating study tips.

Culturally Responsive Teaching Series

The Teaching Academy, in partnership with the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC), offers a special training opportunity: The Culturally Responsive Teaching (CRT) Workshop Series.

The CRT Program trains faculty and others by engaging them in self-reflective processes that allow them to convey to others—students, for example—the need for self-reflection, for self-awareness, for mindful engagement in life’s ever-changing cultural contexts. The CRT Program at CCBC emphasizes that because we human beings are the most social of animals, wherever human beings are, culture is always present. Our perceptions, interpretations, beliefs, and even our knowledge are culturally framed by our experiences in unique social networks of meaning making. Because perceptions of race are learned within bonded social-cultural networks, “race” too is always present and should be examined cooperatively and respectfully through dialogue.

Culturally Responsive Teaching Series  - Spring 2020
When: TBD
Location: TBD

Returning Spring 2020...

CIRTL Online Workshops and Courses