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August 2015

I   Teaching Academy Update
Call for faculty teaching mentors!

II   Teaching Tips: Guidelines for Inquiry-Based Project Work
A useful rubric for use in your classroom

III   Blackboard Updates
Reminders and updates for this fall

IV   HORNET
The New Hopkins Research Network

V   Interim Academic Reporting for Faculty via Starfish
Monitoring student performance is now easier

VI   Classroom Technology News and Notes
Gilman classrooms ready for fall

VII   Homewood Researchers: Take the 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication Survey
What tools do you use? Google Drive? Word? Papers? Endnote? Google Scholar? Scopus?  

 

I   Teaching Academy Update

Preparation for University Teaching logoTeaching Academy doctoral students and postdocs are requesting access to faculty mentors to help guide them through their first teaching assignments. As the Preparing Future Faculty Teaching Academy begins its third academic year, additional faculty mentors are needed to guide participants through their first teaching assignments or to provide co-teaching opportunities. In the initial phases of the Teaching Academy, doctoral students and postdocs acquire an introduction to pedagogy and engage in hands-on resource development, after which they are ready to take on their initial teaching assignments. It is at this stage that they need faculty mentors to better understand what is required to be a successful instructor. Two flexible options are available: 1. Offer consultation and guidance for a teaching assignment: help your mentee develop teaching goals and carry them out in a Hopkins course. In this option, a faculty mentor would agree to help a doctoral student or postdoc to develop teaching goals and learning objectives and align them with a teaching activity, determine active learning activities to offer in the course, and suggest appropriate methods of evaluation. The mentee should teach at least two classes or labs in a course or should teach a complete course through a departmental appointment, a summer or intersession appointment, or through a Teaching Fellowship (e.g., Dean's Teaching or Gordis Fellowship). Mentors should observe mentees as they are teaching and provide constructive comments afterward (a teaching observation form is available to help facilitate feedback). 2. Offer a teaching apprenticeship in a course being taught by the faculty: invite a mentee to serve as co-teacher of one of your courses. Through this option, faculty mentors collaborate with mentees to plan course content and identify and implement assessment strategies. Apprentices should teach at least 6 hours of classes, labs, or units in the faculty member's course. For a more detailed description of the PFF TA Apprenticeship and the "Role of the Mentor," please click here. Through either of these options, a "live" teaching opportunity for the student should be part of the student's mentorship with a minimum of 6 hours teaching a credit course. Students will enter their mentorships after they have been exposed to formal pedagogical theory and have engaged in hands-on development of sample teaching resources. In this sense, doctoral students and/or postdocs will be more prepared to collaborate with faculty mentors than the typical TA or RA. It is our hope that faculty and students will find the mentor-mentee relationship of mutual benefit. Faculty who are interested in participating as teaching mentors are requested to co-develop a Mentor-Mentee Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to clarify mutual expectations. If you would like to become involved in this new program as a mentor or have any questions or concerns, please contact Program Manager, Kelly Clark at pff.teachingacademy@jhu.edu.
 

II   Teaching Tips: Guidelines for Inquiry-Based Project Work

Three students engaged in field work.If you are interested in problem-based learning, check this post from the Tomorrow's Professor Mailing List that provides a rubric for team-based, inquiry-based work. The guidelines are taken from the book Teaching in Blended Learning Environments: Creating and Sustaining Communities of Inquiry by Norman D. Vaughan, Martha Cleveland-Innes, and D. Randy Garrison. [2013, Athabasca University Press]. A free PDF of the book is available. The display of the table with the rubric on the Tomorrow's Professor site is difficult to read; a better version can be found here at the University of Regina's Teaching Resources website. The rubric covers eight dimensions to consider in inquiry-based project work: authenticity, academic rigor, assessment, beyond the school, use of digital technologies, connecting with experts, and elaborated communication. It provides a sound starting place for guiding your implementation of inquiry-based learning. You may also find useful The Innovative Instructor blog post with definitions of inquiry-based learning, problem-based learning, case-based learning, and experiential learning.
 

III   Blackboard Updates

Fall 2015 Blackboard course shells are available now. Friendly reminder: faculty do not have to request Blackboard course shells - all full time AS/EN courses have a course site by default in Blackboard. For a course to be seen by students, it must be made available by the instructor: Making a Blackboard Course Available. Blackboard logo.• Training: Blackboard training sessions are available for faculty and TAs at the CER for new and experienced users. Please check the training schedule for dates and times and to register for sessions - http://www.cer.jhu.edu/bb.html#training. If you prefer an individual consultation, our staff is happy to accommodate that need as well. • Course Copy: A reminder that course material is not automatically copied over from semester to semester. If you want to reuse material from a Blackboard course taught in a previous semester, you'll need to use the Course Copy feature. Course Copy allows you to select which parts of a course you would like copied and then copies those parts over to the new course shell. For the Course Copy feature to work properly, 1) you must be an instructor in both courses, and 2) the course to be copied into must be an existing course. Please see the Course Copy tutorial for more details. Note: Multiple course copies over several semesters can result in a large amount of accumulated and unwanted files, tests, etc. This can cause significant drain to the system and even failure of course copy to work properly. If you are in this situation, consider starting with a fresh, empty course shell to avoid potential problems. • Course Merge: It is possible for instructors to request that multiple sections of courses be merged into one section so that only one Blackboard site is used/maintained instead of multiple sites. Please see the information page on Merging Courses in Blackboard for more information and how to request a merge.
 

IV   HORNET

In spring 2014, the National Science Foundation awarded IT@JH and Physics & Astronomy a Cyber Infrastructure grant for the creation of an internal high-speed research network. HorNet logo.The creation of a Hopkins Research Network (HORNET) connects Bayview, East Baltimore and Homewood campuses using 100 Gigabit Ethernet technology. This network greatly enhances the ability to transfer large data sets throughout the institution as scientific data sets at universities are expanding from terabytes to petabytes at an exponential rate. This NSF award will help to enhance and re-architect the existing Hopkins networking infrastructure, establishing a robust, research-oriented "Science DMZ" that enables high-speed data movement both internally and externally. A high speed connection now exists between this network and the new Maryland Advanced Research Computing Center located at Bayview. HORNET became fully operational this past spring. If you are a Hopkins researcher and need to transfer large datasets, please contact Dean Zarriello at deanz@jhu.edu for additional details.
 

V   Interim Academic Reporting for Faculty via Starfish

Beginning in October, faculty will be asked to complete the interim academic reports, now called progress surveys, online via Starfish. Starfish is accessible via Blackboard and is an excellent step forward Starfish Logo.to providing better academic tracking and intervention for students in need. You do not need to be using Blackboard in your course to access Starfish through Blackboard to complete the interim report. Emails will go out in October alerting you that the progress survey is live, with continued reminders until it closes in November. More information is available at the Starfish help site. For more information on Starfish or to request training for yourself or your department, please email Emily Calderone, at emily.calderone@jhu.edu. We look forward to this initiative providing easier access for faculty and better transparency across offices.
 

VI   Classroom Technology News and Notes

Technology upgrades in the Gilman Hall general pool classrooms have been completed. NewSwivel-arm computer in classroom. computers, on swivel arms, were tested during the summer sessions. Here are some additional updates: • The Macbook Pro classroom computers have been replaced by Dell PCs. (Some departments have retained the old Macs in their department offices for faculty who prefer to use them in the classrooms.) • Though all general pool classrooms have computers, faculty always have the option to bring their own to use in class. However, connectivity procedures have changed. VGA is no longer available, so faculty will need an HDMI adapter to use their laptops. Please contact the Classroom/Audiovisual Technology Support group (KIT-CATS) at 410.516.6699 or kitcatshelp@jhu.edu for advice about which adapter may be appropriate for specific computers. • Six Gilman rooms have Barco ClickShares which will allow faculty to project from their laptops without using a cable. They do require a USB adapter, which will be available at the equipment rack in the room. Rooms with ClickShares have had their floor boxes disabled. • For a training session on how to use the new equipment in Gilman, please contact Classroom/Audiovisual Technology Support group (KIT-CATS) at 410.516.6699 or kitcatshelp@jhu.edu. Despite a few bumps, the first year for the Panopto lecture capture system was highly successful. Over 2000 class hours were recorded, generating more than 200,000 views (almost 40,000 hours). More than 100 courses integrated Panopto recordings with Blackboard. In addition, departmental lecture series and special events were streamed live and made available for later viewing. The Classroom/Audiovisual Technology Support group (KIT-CATS) is continuing its efforts to ensure Panopto service is reliable and easy to use and is exploring ways to automate recording as part of the service. Faculty who are interested in learning more about Panopto and how to use it should contact Nicole Pagano (npagano1@jhu.edu) for training and assistance. Faculty who already use Panopto to make recordings on their own, should ensure they have the latest version of the Focus Recorder. This is available for download at the Panopto login. Classroom/Audiovisual Technology Support group (KIT-CATS) staff updates. Sean Stanley, a key participant in our Panopto roll-out, left JHU in August after 14 years to pursue his dreams in Hollywood. Also, Corey Banks, who was instrumental in the design and deployment of classroom technologies throughout the Homewood campus, is moving at the end of August. Both will be missed! Nicole Pagano is assuming some of Sean's Panopto responsibilities, and KIT-CATS is actively seeking to fill remaining vacancies. While the team is short handed, faculty patience and understanding is appreciated! Finally, as the fall semester begins, here are some reminders for classroom support. Assistance for in-class problems is available at 410.516.6699 for immediate help or at kitcatshelp@jhu.edu.
 

VII   Homewood Researchers: Take the 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication Survey

Your librarians would like to know what tools faculty use so that library services and resources can be optimized. Please take the 101 Innovations in Scholarly Communication survey, developed at Utrecht University. Librarians there are engaged in an international effort to chart the evolving landscape of scholarly communication. The survey will investigate how tool usage varies by field, country and position. It will run until February 2016. Discovery-Analysis-Writing-Publication-Outreach-Assessment Flowchart The JHU survey results will be shared with Sheridan Libraries in Spring 2016. We in turn will make it available in JScholarship, our institutional repository. Librarians will analyze the data with an eye to optimizing services and products to make your research more productive. Questions can be directed to your librarian.