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April 2016

I   New Classroom Technology Showcased at MSE Library
Join us on May 3rd from 1-3 PM on Q-level

II   The Teaching Academy Announces Upcoming Training Opportunities
Please pass this along to your PhD students and Postdocs to support their professional development!

III   Faculty Spotlight: Alison Papadakis, Associate Teaching Professor, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences
A continuing series on teaching excellence at Homewood

IV   How Do You Get Your Students to Do the Assigned Reading?
Learn about new approaches

V   Blackboard Updates
Discontinued Support for Chat and Virtual Classroom Tools

VI   Classroom Technology News and Notes
Classroom updates underway!

VII   Publish and Plan Your Data Management with JHU Data Management Services
Help is here for grant-required data management planning

VIII   Johns Hopkins Video and Collaboration Services
Learn more about the Polycom Web Suite  

 

I   New Classroom Technology Showcased at MSE Library

Logo for Technology Fellowship Program Winners of the 2015-16 Technology Fellows competition will demonstrate their technology-enhanced instructional innovations on Tuesday, May 3, from 1:00 – 3:00 pm on Q-Level at the Milton S. Eisenhower Library. All of the winning faculty-student teams will be available for hands-on demonstrations of how they used their $5,000 mini-grants to enhance undergraduate instruction. Projects cover a wide range of disciplines from the Krieger and Whiting Schools. This year's initiatives include resources for Applied Chemistry, flipping a cultural studies course on Brazilian culture, Mesopotamian Art Through Open Education Resources in Near Eastern Studies, training in Sociology research practicum courses, virtual labs for Statics and Mechanics of Materials in Civil Engineering, and the synchronized heart rate acceleration recording device (SHARD) developed in Biomedical Engineering. Stop by - all attendees will receive gift certificates for the Brody Learning Commons Café! Now in its fifteenth year, the Technology Fellows Program was created to assist Johns Hopkins faculty in the development of digital course resources. Funded by the Office of the President and the Smart Family Foundation, the program awards $5,000 grants to faculty/student teams for projects that integrate technology into instructional initiatives. CER technology experts and librarians collaborate with faculty-student teams on projects that encourage active learning, facilitate access to course materials, and enhance pedagogy. For more information contact Cheryl Wagner at cwagner@jhu.edu (410.516.7181).

 

II   The Teaching Academy Announces Upcoming Training Opportunities

Logo for Preparing Future Faculty Teaching Academy The Teaching Academy offers doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows from all Johns Hopkins divisions instructional training and academic career preparation opportunities through courses, workshops, teaching practicums, teaching as research fellowship appointments and individual consultations. Below is a list of upcoming development opportunities available to your doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows: May Teaching Institute The three-day immersive Teaching Institute will be held May 24th- 26th on the Homewood Campus. For more information and to register, click here! Preparing Future Faculty Teaching Academy Certificate Program Applications accepted through August 1st, 2016 for the 2016-2017 cohort. For more information about this program and to apply, click here ! Teaching-as-Research Fellowship Program Applications accepted through July 1st, 2016 Offered twice annually, the next cohort targets those who plan to teach during fall 2016 or intersession 2017 and wish to conduct a small educational research project. Training workshops to help fellows prepare their teaching-as-research projects will begin in mid-July. This program carries a stipend of $1,250 for each fellow. For more information and to apply, click here! 2016 Lilly International Conference Evidence-based Teaching & Learning - Bethesda, MD, June 2-5 A very limited number of internal grants are available from the Teaching Academy to support graduate student and postdoctoral fellow registration fees. If interested, please email pff.teachingacdemy@jhu.edu.

 

III   Faculty Spotlight: Alison Papadakis, Associate Teaching Professor, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences

Faculty eNews is trying something different with this issue. For our Faculty Spotlight section, we offer a short video that enables our faculty member - Alison Papadakis of Psychological and Brain Sciences - to tell readers about her approach to teaching in her own voice.

 

IV   How Do You Get Your Students to Do the Assigned Reading?

It's a perennial problem: faculty assign, but students don't read. David Gooblar, They Haven't Done the Reading. Again. [The Chronicle of Higher Education, Vitae, Pedagogy Unbound, September 24, 2014] dismisses the use of quizzes to motivate students, asserting they are punitive and time-consuming. What to do instead? Clipart of woman reading Gooblar suggests starting by ensuring the assigned reading is really necessary. Students prioritize their work and won't bother with the reading if they feel it is not essential. Make sure that required reading aligns with course objectives and can be completed in a reasonable amount of time. Show students that the reading is, indeed, necessary. At the end of class, preview the upcoming reading assignment, explain how it fits into the material to be covered in the next class, and give the students some questions to consider as they do the reading. Handouts created for the students can also be useful, Gooblar writes. These can be specific to each reading assignment or more general to be used for all the readings. Questions posed in handouts help prepare students for in-class discussion. End by asking "What one question would you like me to answer in class about the reading?" Instead of a quiz, create a questionnaire to gauge problems students are having with the reading. "By asking questions that point to the use you'll make of the reading, you'll underline the fact that the reading is indeed integral to the course. You'll also provide yourself with useful information to guide your lecture or class discussion," Gooblar states. These questionnaires can be used to monitor students' completion of the reading. Finally, Gooblar advises making use of the information from the reading assignments in class without repeating it in detail. Why should students spend their time reading if you are going to tell them what they need to know? Reading should serve as a foundation for in-class discussion so that lecture time can build on the ideas presented in the reading. Another resource is the special report from Faculty Focus on Teaching, which offers 11 Strategies for Getting Students to Read What's Assigned [Magna Publications, July 2010]. These are short articles with many useful suggestions including: introduce the textbook and encourage use of supplemental materials the textbook provides, identify discipline-specific terminology, have students mark-up readings, structure the reading by providing questions to be answered ahead of class, use the textbook in class to emphasize its importance, teach students to ask questions about the reading, link the reading to exams, and identify and work with students who need help with reading. By doing just a little reading yourself, you'll find a solution to the assigned reading problem.

 

V   Blackboard Updates

Blackboard Logo Blackboard announced recently that it will discontinue support for its chat and virtual classroom tools after June 30, 2016. Both of these tools are Java applets and require the use of third-party software, which is no longer supported by many browsers as of last year. Future Blackboard Learn releases will not include these tools. If you are currently using either of these tools and need alternative solutions, please send an email to cerweb@jhu.edu. Summer Reminders Summer 2016 course shells are now available. If you need assistance building your summer course, please contact CER staff to make an appointment. Summer is a great time to clean up your courses and remove any unused files that are simply taking up space. If you've used the 'course copy' feature over multiple semesters to copy files from one course to another, you most likely have some unnecessary material in your course site. It is highly recommended that you take the time to delete these files and start with a clean, empty course shell. Overburdened courses put a strain on the system and can cause the failure of course copy altogether.

 

VI   Classroom Technology News and Notes

The most significant change in classroom technology has occurred in Gilman classrooms, where Dell all-in-one computers replaced aging Macbook Pro computers. Barco ClickShare wireless presentation systems have replaced broken floor boxes. The ClickShares have performed as expected, with no support problems to date. Planning is underway to replace the remaining (functional) floor boxes in Gilman. New Hodson Hall Podium The Hodson Hall classrooms also received attention over spring break, with the installation of new presentation desks. Replacing broken podiums, these desks are similar to those installed in Mudd 26 and Olin 305, which were well received by faculty. This year has seen the continued increase in use of the Panopto lecture capture system. JHU is currently on a pace to exceed 60,000 usage hours for the year, including recording and viewing times. Though Panopto is flexible, and recordings can be made using simple web cams, some classrooms have been configured to be completely Panopto-ready. This winter an integrated camera was added in Olin 305; Hackerman B-17 will experience the same improvement this summer. Another initiative this summer will be updating 20 of our oldest classrooms. Faculty have expressed frustration in trying to connect newer laptops to old, lower-resolution projection systems. Updates will include new projectors and controls, along with digital inputs to support modern devices. Four of our oldest and most outdated on the third floor of Krieger Hall will be offline for the next academic year during the Krieger Hall water infiltration project. These classrooms will be completely redesigned and renovated during this period. This project will also have an impact on our GIS-focused computer classroom on the first floor of Krieger, which will be relocated to Shaffer 2 immediately following the end of this semester. Getting help. Please know that classroom technology help is always close at hand. If you experience any problems call 410.516.6699. Also, CATS staff members are happy to provide individual or departmental training on use of the classrooms. Please email kitcats@jhu.edu to schedule training.

 

VII   Publish and Plan Your Data Management with JHU Data Management Services

Research, especially when grant-funded, has many demands from proposal to publication and transitions to next projects. JHU Data Management Services (JHUDMS) provides support for tasks that bookend the research cycle. For grant proposals, JHUDMS offers guidelines for preparing data management plans and data sharing statements now required by most US federal funders. DMS consultants will schedule a brief meeting to help efficiently craft a plan tailored for funder requirements with optimal data sharing solutions and will provide feedback on data management plan drafts. To help implement those plans, JHUDMS offers training sessions and consulting on data management best practices such as creating backup plans, sharing data with collaborators, and protecting human subject identifiers. Data Management Services Word Cloud Graphic Research projects do not necessarily end with publications when PI's are asked by funders, publishers, and colleagues to share supporting data. JHU DMS will help find appropriate data repositories for any research field. They also operate the JHU Data Archive for providing online access to data in any digital format. Their Small Data Collections Archiving Service is available at no cost to JHU researchers for publishing up to 20GB of research data from projects, such as data associated with a current publication. (Options are available for sharing larger projects.) JHU DMS consultants facilitate the data deposit process and creating citations with DOI identifiers. Publishing data with an online repository can increases the impact of research and encourages the research community to discover, cite, and reuse data. Preparing data for sharing also helps researchers preserve their projects for future use and reference, and JHU DMS offers resources for efficient project preservation. Compliance with funder data management plans or publisher requests for data sharing add tasks to the busy research cycle, sometimes without apparent reward. JHU DMS, however, strives to increase the efficiency of complying with these requirements while demonstrating how better managed data, a citable data publication, or a reusable project can enhance research. Further information about JHU Data Management Services can be found at: http://dmp.data.jhu.edu/ or contact them at datamanagement@jhu.edu.

 

VIII   Johns Hopkins Video and Collaboration Services

Johns Hopkins Integration Services Video and Collaboration (ISVC) provides coordination and support for collaboration over the network that connects all schools, centers, and divisions of the Johns Hopkins Institutions, ranging from telemedicine to distance learning. JH Video And Collabortaion Services Conference Room Since 2013, Johns Hopkins has standardized and enhanced its infrastructure to provide redundant video and audio conferencing capabilities. With the integration and use of Polycom Web Suite, users including those in University classes, have the ability to collaborate from any PC, laptop, or mobile device anywhere there is an internet connection. Participants using traditional room-based systems, telephones, computers or mobile devices can be joined seamlessly into a face-to-face, one on one, or group meeting and can even share content from almost anywhere. We encourage everyone to "just think of the possibilities!" For more information or to schedule a demo, visit our website https://cds.johnshopkins.edu/ISVC/video_conf.html or contact: Guy Welty, Manager, ISVC at 667-208-6111 or gwelty2@jhu.edu.